This article originally appeared on eightieskids.com

If you ask most people what Quentin Tarantino’s greatest movie is, the answer will usually be Pulp Fiction. We tend to disagree, however, as whilst it’s clear that Pulp Fiction is one of the greatest movies ever made, there’s something about Tarantino’s very first flick that sets our pulses racing just that little bit more.

Released all the way back in 1992, Reservoir Dogs starred Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Chris Penn, Steve Buscemi, Lawrence Tierney, Michael Madsen, Tarantino himself and Edward Bunker, all playing diamond thieves whose planned jewellery store heist goes horribly wrong. Below are 25 things you might not have realised about this classic of the genre, so without further ado, “let’s go to work.”

25. The film was originally going to be black and white and star Tarantino’s friends

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Today, Reservoir Dogs is celebrated as one of the great American crime movies, a tight, disturbing, darkly funny classic of the genre that’s still being quoted almost three decades later. You just have to wonder, though: would the film have become so iconic had Tarantino stuck to the original plan? Before the movie got some Hollywood backing, Tarantino had planned to film Reservoir Dogs in black and white on a budget of just $30,000, with his buddies helping out and playing the main parts.

Luckily, however, one of Tarantino’s friends, the producer Lawrence Bender, who was originally going to star in the film as Nice Guy Eddie, gave the script to his acting teacher. Liking the script, the acting teacher passed the script to his wife, the wife passed the script to a member of acting royalty, and the rest is history. The ‘member of acting royalty’, by the way, was none other than one of the stars of such classics as Mean Streets, The Duellists and Taxi Driver.

24. Harvey Keitel got the film funded himself

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It wasn’t just anyone that Lawrence Bender’s acting teacher’s wife passed the Reservoir Dogs script on to. In a fortuitous turn of events, the Dogs script ended up in the hands of none other than Harvey Keitel, an acting icon and one of Tarantino’s own personal favourites.

Keitel, best known for his collaborations with Martin Scorsese including Mean Streets and Taxi Driver, liked what he read so much that he signed on the film as star as well as co-producer. Helping Tarantino to raise a $1.5 million budget, Keitel even paid for auditions in New York, which led to the casting of Steve Buscemi. It’s no surprise that Tarantino would write the part of Pulp Fiction’s ‘fixer’ The Wolf just for Keitel; to Tarantino, Keitel was the one who fixed his entire career.

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