How many times have we heard men talk about women’s butts?

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They talk about bubble butts, toned butts and big butts as if they are wonders of the universe. It’s no secret men love women with booties.

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Elite Daily

Psychology researchers at Turkey’s Bilkent University showed 300 men pictures of women’s silhouettes with several degrees of spine curvature, Daily Mail reports. They were then asked to report which ones were the most and least attractive. Most of the men were more attracted to a spine curvature of 45.5 degrees which I would assume makes their butts look bigger.

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These men were also shown three pictures of women with butts that were the same size but for different reasons: spine curvature, excess fat and excess muscle. Much to my surprise, the woman with the curved spine was the most attractive the majority of the men.

This indicates that the angle of the spine, not the size, of a woman’s behind has a larger impact on men and their attraction to women.

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Dr. David Lewis said,

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Men who think they like big bottoms may actually be more into spines. Men may be directing their attention to the butt and obtaining information about women’s spines, even if they are unaware that that is what their minds are doing.

It turns out, men have found spines of this curvature attractive for centuries. It has to do with a woman’s ability to find food and have children. Dr. Lewis also said that a 45-degree curve gives women the ability to search for food later into their pregnancies and keep bearing children without injury.

It is proven that women without these specific curved spines can hardly move during pregnancy. Apparently a spine without such a curve increases the pressure on their hips by almost 800 percent! The evolutionary benefits of being with women who have these body types have become engrained in men’s minds.

It turns out the reason men like big butts so much runs a lot deeper than appearance.

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This study was originally published in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior.